Quick Navigation

 

Guide for applicants, Part 1: How to get a European patent

 
 
Abstract
97
The abstract merely serves for use as technical information. It may not be taken into account for any other purpose, such as interpreting the scope of the protection sought or applying Article 54(3). It must be so drafted that it constitutes an efficient instrument for searching in the particular technical field, particularly by making it possible to assess whether the European patent application itself needs to be consulted.
98
The abstract, which must be preceded by the title of the invention, must contain a concise summary (preferably no more than 150 words long) of the disclosure as contained in the description, claims and drawings. It should indicate the technical field to which the invention relates, unless that is already clear from the title, and should be so drafted as to allow a clear understanding of the technical problem, the gist of the solution of that problem through the invention and the principal use of the invention. 
99
If your application contains drawings, you must indicate the figure or, exceptionally, figures which you suggest should accompany the published abstract. In this case each main feature mentioned in the abstract and illustrated in the drawing must be followed by the corresponding reference sign in parentheses.  
100
The definitive content of the abstract is determined by the examiner (see point 148). Once the abstract has been published as part of the European patent application (see point 149), it is not amended again.