Programme

Thursday, 3 April 2014
Friday, 4 April 2014

Thursday, 3 April 2014

08.30

Registration (with light breakfast buffet)

09.30

Welcome speech

 
Willy Minnoye, Vice-President DG1 Operations, European Patent Office 

09.50

Twelve things you didn't know you knew about Espacenet (and the Register too!)

 

Did you know that with Espacenet and the European Patent Register you can:

 
  • find patents
  • find legal-status information
  • inspect files
  • sort and share results
  • search by CPC
  • translate documents
  • download documents
  • automate searches
  • monitor patents as they are published
  • monitor applications as they progress
  • view images
  • find families and citations

and much more? If not, this lecture will provide valuable insights!

 

Nigel Clarke

10.25

Asian documentation at the European Patent Office

 

Over the past number of years there has been a huge explosion in patent documentation originating in Asia.
This lecture examines the sheer volume of incoming documentation, and how it is dealt with at the EPO. It focuses primarily on how the data is gathered and put into a usable format for the examiners, and how the examiners can then access and use it as an integral part of their search strategy.
The lecture also looks at key figures arising from the present situation, especially with regard to the amount of documentation consulted and ending up in European search reports.

 

Jeremy Scott and Sophie Mangin 

10.55

Notorious knowledge: when it is known that it is known

 

The boards of appeal of the European Patent Office developed the concept of "notorious knowledge" to describe knowledge defined by features for which no search is necessary. The term has also found its way into the Guidelines for Examination in the European Patent Office.
In some cases of notorious knowledge the search report may even cite no documents and still be considered complete. This lecture will explain how notorious knowledge differs from "implicit features" and will clarify how and when this concept may be applied.


Giuseppe Fiorani

11.15

Coffee break

11.45

Workshop session one

 

WS04 - Focusing and refocusing your search: the problem-and-solution approach
Anne-Cécile Derrien

WS02 - Unity of invention
Petra van de Wetering and Jörg Konter

WS13 - Access to search results from the Asian patent offices and translations of the prior art cited
Sophie Mangin, Christine Kämmer and Bart Degroote

WS22 - Antibodies and antibody-like molecules
Peter Bumb

WS21 - Internet search: non-patent literature documents in telecommunications
Terese Englund and John Michael Walker Pina

 

WS08 - Finding legal status data with the Global Patent Index
Patrick Le Gonidec

WS24 - 3D printing and additive manufacturing techniques
Nathalie Pierre and Judy Ceulemans

WS18 - Searching Markush formulae in organic and inorganic chemistry
Miren Langer and Thomas Maxisch

WS26 - Second medical use inventions
Camilla Bonzano

WS06 - Patent search: abstracts published together with patent applications vs. "enhanced" abstracts
Alain Materne and Gershom Sleightholme-Albanis 

13.00

Lunch buffet

14.00

Workshop session two

 

WS01 - Forward searching: a complement to keyword and class-based prior-art searches

Olivier Couteau

WS04 - Focusing and refocusing your search: the problem-and-solution approach
Anne-Cécile Derrien

WS19 - Searching climate change mitigation technologies using CPC section "Y"
Victor Veefkind and Stefano Angelucci

WS20 - Search strategies in mechanics with focus on medical devices
Volker Franz

WS06 - Patent search: abstracts published together with patent applications vs. "enhanced" abstracts
Alain Materne and Gershom Sleightholme-Albanis

WS03 - Searching Russian and Indian prior art
Alan Bacon

WS07 - Searching Chinese and Korean prior art
Alexandre Bouffier and Bertrand Le Chapelain

WS16 - Searching chemical inventions by name
Tim Lange

WS21 - Internet search: non-patent literature documents in telecommunications
Terese Englund and John Michael Walker Pina

WS02 - Unity of invention
Petra van de Wetering and Jörg Konter

15.15

Coffee break

15.45

Workshop session three

 

WS05 - When to stop a search

Günther Aichmayr

WS01 - Forward searching: a complement to keyword and class-based prior-art searches
Olivier Couteau

WS17 - Traditional knowledge in applied chemistry
Andreas Jakobs

WS04 - Focusing and refocusing your search: the problem-and-solution approach
Anne-Cécile Derrien

WS08 - Finding legal status data with the Global Patent Index
Patrick Le Gonidec

WS21 - Internet search: non-patent literature documents in telecommunications
Terese Englund and John Michael Walker Pina

WS20 - Search strategies in mechanics with focus on medical devices
Volker Franz

WS13 - Access to search results from the Asian patent offices and translations of the prior art cited
Sophie Mangin, Christine Kämmer and Bart Degroote

WS22 - Antibodies and antibody-like molecules
Peter Bumb

WS02 - Unity of invention
Petra van de Wetering and Jörg Konter  
 

17.00

An update on the Cooperative Patent Classification

 
The Cooperative Patent Classification (CPC) came into effect in January 2013. It replaced the ECLA classification scheme used by the EPO and the US classification scheme used by the USPTO.
This change affected everyone who uses classifications in their patent searches.
The lecture will outline the major developments relating in the CPC since its introduction almost a year and a half ago, as well as its impact on the international intellectual property community.
 

Roberto Iasevoli

17.30

Cocktail

18.30

Dinner

22.00

End of first day

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Friday, 4 April 2014

09.00

Do you speak English?- The challenges of the English language for searchers

 

The English language is a rich and complex language which can cause problems for native English speakers as well as those who speak a different language. Some possible problems for patent searchers using text, some of which are relevant for any language, are mentioned, with examples of usage in databases.
These include the use of “patentese” by patent attorneys; “faux amis”, false friends, where words spelt the same in different languages may mean different things; terminology can take time to settle down, creating numerous synonyms; Americanisms, with different spellings or different words; the numerous synonyms, due partly to those Americanisms, but also to the many Norman French words added to a Germanic base; the different meanings that the same word can have; many words are both nouns and verbs, but many are not; some words are spelt the same but pronounced differently; some words can be spelt as one or as two words; and misspellings by the applicants or in the database.

All searchers should use separate words as well as the whole word for compound nouns such as “wheelchair” to avoid missing material. Those who search a single subject area can usefully compile a list of words and spelling to use in that area.
 
Stephen van Dulken, formerly patent specialist at the British Library 
 

09.50

Inside the mind of an EPO examiner


Are you curious to know how examiners think? Or how they balance quality, timeliness and efficiency?
The bedrock of any high quality search and examination lies in the consistent application of legal concepts and procedures as defined by the EPC and the Guidelines for Examination. In addition, experienced patent examiners bring in strategic thinking, service orientation and sound judgment and decision skills to complement their technical and legal expertise.
This lecture aims to provide insight into the many "soft issues", constraints and challenges facing the examiner with a view to highlighting those aspects of direct relevance to applicants.



Among the topics that will be addressed are:

 
  • How does an examiner come to an understanding of the invention?
  • How are claims dissected and search strategies developed?
  • How to judge the relevance of cited documents in the search report and interpret written communications?
  • What happens in the event of complications (non-patentability, lack of unity, complex applications, …)?

This glimpse inside the examiner’s mind will help to optimise inter alia the patent searching and drafting process, as well as the interaction between professional representatives and examiners.

 

Philippe Lahorte

10.30

The Common Citation Document (CCD) web application: how to benefit from the search results of patent offices

 

The search report established by a patent office mentions documents which may be taken into consideration when deciding whether the invention to which a patent application relates is patentable. This report contains valuable information which, once public, can be accessed through different services on the websites of some of the major patent offices. In the current international IP landscape, patent applications tend to belong to large families, where a search report is established for each family member and made accessible by the patent office that performed the search.

The Common Citation Document (CCD) service is the result of an IP5 co-operation project and proposes a single point of access to all prior-art documents cited by each patent office for each patent application and related patent applications belonging to the same family.

The CCD service provides access to this information in a standardised format via a system that makes citation data from patent offices available to the public. This access is simplified by several features on the CCD web application, in particular the graphic display of the timespan for a collection of citations, such as relevant priority, filing and publication dates of a patent application.

This lecture explains how the retrieval of citations, simplified by easy access to the CCD web application, can help patent searchers during the search phase. A number of special cases and examples will be given special attention. Some examples of the combined use of the CCD web application and DI+ will further stress the importance of the retrieved citations when combined with file wrapper data. 

 

Pietro Rini

11.00

Coffee break

11.30

Workshop session four

 
WS10 - Searching functional features
Alessandro Colombo

WS05 - When to stop a search
Günther Aichmayr

WS01 - Forward searching: a complement to keyword and class-based prior-art searches
Olivier Couteau

WS09 - PATSTAT online
Geert Boedt

WS02 - Unity of invention
Petra van de Wetering and Jörg Konter

WS23 - Biotechnology search strategies: finding a way through patents, papers and sequences
Peter Seranski

WS16 - Searching chemical inventions by name
Tim Lange

WS08 - Finding legal status data with the Global Patent Index
Patrick Le Gonidec

WS22 - Antibodies and antibody-like molecules
Peter Bumb

WS03 - Searching Russian and Indian prior art
Alan Bacon

WS07 - Searching Chinese and Korean prior art
Alexandre Bouffier and Bertrand Le Chapelain
 
 

12.45

Lunch buffet

13.45

Workshop session five

 
WS12 - How to interpret EPO search reports
Kris Loveniers

WS05 - When to stop a search
Günther Aichmayr

WS10 - Searching functional features
Alessandro Colombo

WS15 - Searching in PubMed and focusing on the power of the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) database
Wolfram Meyer

WS20 - Search strategies in mechanics with focus on medical devices
Volker Franz

WS08 - Finding legal status data with the Global Patent Index
Patrick Le Gonidec

WS07 - Searching Chinese and Korean prior art
Alexandre Bouffier and Bertrand Le Chapelain

WS25 - Searching products requiring product-by-process and/or parameter definition
Heide Götz and Bernd Goers

WS18- Searching Markush formulae in organic and inorganic chemistry
Miren Langer and Thomas Maxisch

WS14 - Non-patent literature
Els Vadot-Van Geldre and Yves Verbandt
 
 

15.00

Coffee break

15.30

Workshop session six

 
WS14 - Non-patent literature
Els Vadot-Van Geldre and Yves Verbandt

WS20 - Search strategies in mechanics with focus on medical devices
Volker Franz

WS11 - Access to Japanese prior art using classification and citation information
Christoph Wirner and Adam Cohen

WS25 - Searching products requiring product-by-process and/or parameter definition
Heide Götz and Bernd Goers

WS13 - Access to search results from the Asian patent offices and translations of the prior art cited
Sophie Mangin, Christine Kämmer and Bart Degroote

WS23 - Biotechnology search strategies: finding a way through patents, papers and sequences
Peter Seranski

WS24 - 3D printing and additive manufacturing techniques
Nathalie Pierre and Judy Ceulemans

WS12 - How to interpret EPO search reports
Kris Loveniers 
 

16.45

Closing remarks

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