Patent Knowledge Week

2-5 November 2021

A new four-day digital event which promotes the dissemination of patent information and the generation of patent knowledge.


 

Technology transfer case studies

Technology transfer case studies visual

The technology transfer case studies illustrate how patents facilitate technology transfer from R&D-conducting organisations and promote market success. The examples cover a range of economic sectors, countries and types of technology transfer. Each case study provides key takeaways for stakeholders in universities, other public research organisations and businesses. Overall, they demonstrate the importance of patents for technology transfer to start-ups, spin-offs and established companies.

Case studies

Select a company name to access more information and downloadable materials.

Oxeon (technical textiles – Sweden)

Textiles for the extreme

  • Combining private commercial mechanisms with informal university support can form a valuable public-private partnership for effective and efficient technology transfer.
  • Capturing niche markets to build sales and brand awareness is a useful entry into larger markets with higher entry barriers.
  • Involving top managers and inventors in the patent portfolio building process is vital to the strategic relevance of patent protection.
  • Consider patenting further along the value chain, and protecting applications of a technology close to the consumer market, to increase the scope of patent protection and build a comprehensive control position.

Technical field

Country

Main product

Technology transfer model

Technical textiles

Sweden

Spread tow

Reinforcements for different application areas

Public-private partnership; university spin-off

OxeonA new weaving method using composite material was the basis for the foundation of Swedish start-up Oxeon. IP rights for the technology helped to attract private investment. Oxeon also benefitted from business support from the Chalmers University of Technology entrepreneurship centre. This combination of private ownership and public innovation support led to the commercialisation of innovative textiles in the sports, industrial and aerospace sectors and the licensing of the weaving technology.

Type of material

Download

Technology transfer case study

  • Oxeon (EN) (PDF, 1.6 MB)

 Podcast

Atlantic Therapeutics (medical devices – Ireland)

Improving quality of life

  • In academy-industry collaborations, recognise all partners' needs and define incentives and criteria so that the company can act as the commercial partner.
  • A joint ownership management agreement is necessary to facilitate later commercialisation if joint foreground IP is anticipated.
  • The deal structure should always be benchmarked so that it is fair and reasonable and reflects industry norms.
  • Agree on key development and commercial milestones early, to guide and facilitate market success, but be willing to amend as necessary.

Technical field

Country

Main product

Technology transfer model

Medical devices

Ireland

Novel training device for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

Technology transfer office as facilitator for university spin-off

Atlantic therapeuticsResearch collaboration between University College Dublin (UCD) and Bio‑Medical Research (BMR) led to the development of a novel training device for the treatment of stress-induced urinary incontinence. UCD licensed the technology to BMR, which validated the device in clinical trials, secured regulatory approval and launched it in Europe. BMR established Atlantic Therapeutics as a spin-out company to secure investment to target the US market. Atlantic Therapeutics, its flagship product, offers patients safe, non-invasive and cost-effective treatment for stress-induced urinary incontinence, improving the quality of lives.

Type of material

Download

Technology transfer case study

Podcast
Improving quality of life: a technology transfer case study 

Dermis Pharma (medical equipment – Turkey)

Healing wounds

  • A well-defined IP policy, qualified commercialisation experts, the support of university administration and a widespread network are critical success factors for IP-based spin-off companies.
  • Spin-off and corporate partnership models are attractive approaches which can be widely implemented by technology transfer offices.
  • The EPO's IPscore tool makes it possible to assess, qualitatively analyse, graphically visualise and document the pros and cons of technologies and research projects.
  • Involving a global IP and licensing network can provide deeper insights and novel pathways for better IP strategy and IP management facilitating commercialisation.

Technical field

Country

Main product

Technology transfer model

Medical equipment

Turkey

Method to produce web-like structure for wound treatment that is both biocompatible and biodegradable

Technology transfer office support; university spin-off; partnership with big pharma company

DermalixThis product to treat open wounds, such as diabetic ulcers, is the result of R&D carried out by four female inventors in the laboratory of Turkey's Ege University. They secured IP protection early on, with the help of the local technology transfer office. However, initial attempts at commercialisation using licensing failed. A start-up acceleration programme encouraged the female inventor team to create the start-up Dermis Pharma. Thanks to its strong IP, the young company managed to secure the necessary venture capital funding for cost-intensive clinical trials and product development. An IP-assignment deal with a big Turkish pharma company sealed a corporate partnership and accelerated the commercialisation process.

Type of material

Download

Technology transfer case study

Podcast

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